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Quit Smoking With Tabex

When Did You Know That It Was Time To Stop Smoking For Good?

Smoking is a major cause of cancer and other diseases. And it’s not something you can just “forget.” It’s a long-term thing.

The sooner you start, the better.

You can’t simply quit cold turkey, but you can learn to manage it. It’s never too late.

In fact, there are many steps you can take to quit smoking. This is what we’ll cover in this article.

If you want to learn more about quitting smoking, you can check out our articles on the subject:

  • How To Quit Smoking
  • When to Quit Smoking

What Does the “Just Say No” Approach Mean?

It’s a phrase you probably know. It’s the one that’s often used in movies. It’s a phrase that’s usually said by someone who’s trying to make you feel guilty for not doing what they want you to do.

You might hear it from your friends, your parents, even your boss. It’s a phrase that keeps showing up in your head, but you don’t have any idea what it really means.

The “Just Say No” Approach

Here’s the catch. You’d be wrong to think that “just say no” means you should just say no.

“Just Say No” is actually a phrase that’s meant to help you put something in your mouth without thinking about it.

If you’re trying to quit smoking, you’ll want to do it in a way that doesn’t make you feel guilty about not doing it.

The goal is to make it so that you’re willing to do it, even though you know it’s not the right thing to do.

You’ll want to do it in a way that doesn’t make you feel like you’re somehow making a bad decision.

“Just Say No” can also be used in a slightly different way.

In this case, you’ll hear it as:

  • “I’m not going to quit smoking. I choose not to. I don’t want to.”

And that’s not at all the same thing as the “Just Say No” approach.

What’s the Difference?

The “Just Say No” approach is a way of doing things that’s often used in the movies when someone’s trying to get someone else to do something.

In the movie, they’ll start off with the “Just Say No” approach and then end up saying “I’m not gonna do it.”

The movie then follows with the person’s response, usually something like:

  • “I’m not going to do it.”
  • “No, you’re not.”
  • “No, you’re not doing it.”

So it’s not quite the same thing as the “Just Say No” approach.

What Is the “Yes, But” Approach?

The “Yes, But” approach is often used in the media when someone’s trying to say yes to something and then add a few conditions.

To do this, you may hear it in different ways:

  • “Yes, and…”
  • “Yes, but…”

It’s almost always used in a negative way in order to say that you have to add something to the yes answer.

For example, if you’re trying to say yes to a date with someone and you say yes, but you also say no, you’re trying to add the condition “but I’ll see you later” to the yes answer.

What Is the “Yes, I’ll” Approach?

The “Yes, I’ll” approach is often used in the media when someone’s trying to say yes to something and add the condition “I’ll see you later” to it.

It’s also sometimes used by people who want to say yes to something without adding anything to it.

For example:

  • “Yes, I’ll see you later.”

So when you hear “Yes, I’ll see you later” it’s usually not saying “Yes, and…” or “Yes, but…”

The “Yes, I’ll” approach is almost always used in a negative way.

What Does the “No, But” Approach Mean?

The “No, but” approach is a phrase you might hear when someone’s trying to say no to something.

It’s also not the same thing as the “Yes, but” approach.

What Does the “Yes, But” Approach Mean?

The “Yes, but” approach is a way that you can add a condition. It could be an extra condition or it could be a condition that’s in addition to the one you already have.

For example:

  • “Yes, but I’ll pay you $50 dollars a week.”
  • “Yes, but I’ll get the check every week by Monday.”
  • “Yes, but we won’t get married until I’m 30.”

The “Yes, but” approach is almost always used in a negative way.

If you want to learn more about the “Yes, But” approach, check out our article on it.

The “No, But” Approach Explained

Here’s a quick explanation on the difference between the “Yes, But” approach and the “No, But” approach.

The “Yes, But” Approach Explained

This approach can be used to say yes to something and add a condition.

For example:

  • “Yes, but that’s not enough.”
  • “Yes, but it’s not that much.”

The goal here is to add a condition to the yes answer.

For example:

  • “Yes, but I need more.”
  • “Yes, but it’s not that much for me.”

Notice how the second example uses the word “that.”

In the second example, you’re saying that the amount isn’t enough.

So, the goal of the “Yes, but” approach is to add a condition to the yes answer in a way that’s helpful to you.

You’re saying to yourself, “That’s not enough,” and the goal is to add something to the yes answer to make it helpful.

What’s the “No, But” Approach Explained?

The “No, but” approach is a way that you can add a condition. It can be an extra condition or it can be a condition that’s in addition to the one you already have.

For example:

  • No, and I’ll see you later

The goal here is to say no to the yes answer and add a condition to it.

For example:

  • No, but I’ll see you later

The reason you might hear this in a negative way is that you’re saying “No, but…”

The goal of the “No, but” approach is to add a condition to the yes answer in a way that’s helpful to you.

The goal is to add something to the yes answer to make it helpful.

What is the outlook?

It’s important to know that while it may sound like the “Yes, but” approach is the best approach, it is not always the best approach.

There are many reasons why it’s not the best approach.

Your goal is to be open to the other person’s point of view. That’s how you’ll determine which of the two approaches works best for you.

What’s the difference between the “Yes, But” Approach and the “No, But” Approach?

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