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Stop Smoking One Week Before Surgery

Smoking before surgery can cause delays and interfere with the healing process. The more you smoke, the longer it takes to heal. Tobacco can slow blood flow, which can also cause the wound to heal more slowly.

If you smoke before surgery, you may be able to stop for a short time. If you smoke heavily, you will need to stop for longer.

If you smoke before surgery, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons recommends that you stop smoking at least one week before your surgery. You will need to follow your provider’s directions carefully, as smoking can cause delays in healing.

Before surgery, you should also stop smoking as much as possible. Talk to your surgeon if you need help to quit smoking.

Do not smoke in the hospital. Smoking in the hospital will delay your recovery. You will not be able to smoke in the hospital.

If you smoke in the hospital, you should also avoid using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). If you do use NRT, you will have to stop it for at least a week.

Do not smoke in the hospital even if you are using NRT.

Do not smoke anything with nicotine until the day of surgery. You should not be smoking before surgery.

Do not use nicotine patches or gum until the day of surgery. Nicotine patches and gum are not approved for use by patients who smoke.

If you are using an inhaler for cough or cold symptoms, you may continue using it for the two days before surgery. Do not use the inhaler for longer than this. Your doctor may give you additional instructions.

Do not use any other nicotine products (such as chewing gum, e-cigarettes, lozenges, or dissolvable nicotine patches) for two weeks before surgery.

Do not eat or drink anything after midnight on the night before your surgery.

If you need to stop eating or drinking anything, do not use an empty stomach. Instead, have a snack or drink about an hour or two before surgery.

Avoid strenuous exercise for at least 48 hours before your surgery. Do not lift more than 10 pounds for the next two weeks.

Avoid using any kind of hot tub or Jacuzzi.

Do not take any medications (such as blood pressure medications, antidepressants, or antihistamines) for these two days.

Avoid taking hot tub or Jacuzzi.

Avoid any lotions, creams, or skin products for two weeks.

If you need to take any medications, take them as directed. Do not skip or delay the doses. If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Do not take more than the prescribed dose.

If you are allergic to any medicines, latex, or iodine, you may need to stop taking them before surgery. Your doctor will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before surgery.

If you are allergic to any of the anesthesia medications, you may need to stop taking these medications before surgery. Your doctor will tell you if you need to stop taking any of the anesthesia medications before surgery.

Keep all regular medical and dental appointments.

Smoking before Surgery: What You Need to Know

In general, surgery is a good thing. However, there are some risks and side effects that you should know about so that you can make an informed decision about whether to have surgery.

Smoking and Your Surgery

Smoking can delay your recovery. Smoking can also interfere with your ability to heal. It can also put you at a higher risk for complications during surgery.

Smoking before surgery may:

  • Delay your recovery
  • Cause complications during your surgery
  • Increase your risk of complications during your surgery
  • Make you sicker

Smoking before surgery can also cause problems for your surgeon. If you smoke, you may need to stop smoking before your surgery. Smoking can slow your recovery. It can also take longer to heal.

If you smoke before surgery, your surgeon may ask you to stop smoking for a certain amount of time before your surgery. You will need to follow your provider’s instructions carefully. Doing so will help to speed up your recovery and reduce your risk for complications.

Smoking and Your Recovery

Smoking after surgery can also delay your recovery. Smoking can also cause complications that can affect your recovery.

Smoking can also put you at a higher risk for complications during your surgery. If you smoke, you may need to stop smoking before your surgery. Smoking can also delay your recovery. It also can put you at a higher risk for complications during your surgery.

Smoking can also make you sicker. If you smoke after surgery, you may need to stop smoking for a certain amount of time. You will need to follow your provider’s instructions carefully. Doing so will help to speed up your recovery and reduce your risk for complications.

Smoking and Your Health

Smoking is harmful to your health. Smoking can cause:

  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes
  • Lung cancer
  • Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD)
  • Lung infections
  • Stroke
  • Diabetes

Smoking can also interfere with your ability to heal. Smoking can delay your recovery. It can also put you at a higher risk for complications during your surgery.

Smoking can also make you sicker. If you are a smoker, you may need to stop smoking for a certain amount of time. You will need to follow your provider’s instructions carefully. Doing so will help to speed up your recovery and reduce your risk for serious complications.

Smoking Can Cause Complications During Your Surgery

Smoking can delay your recovery. Smoking can also cause complications during surgery.

Smoking can make you sicker. If you are a smoker, you may need to stop smoking for a certain amount of time. You will need to follow your provider’s instructions carefully. Doing so will help to speed up your recovery and reduce your risk for serious complications.

Smoking Can Increase Your Risk of Complications During Your Surgery

Smoking can increase your risk for complications during your surgery. If you are a smoker, you may need to stop smoking for a certain amount of time. You will need to follow your provider’s instructions carefully. Doing so will help to speed up your recovery and reduce your risk for serious complications.

A quick recap

The bottom line is that smoking increases the risk for a variety of complications during surgery. If you are thinking about having surgery, talk to your doctor about whether you should stop smoking or not, and when you should stop.

Your doctor can help you decide whether smoking is safe for you to do before your surgery. If you need to stop smoking before surgery, your doctor will let you know when and how to stop smoking.

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