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Quit Smoking With Tabex

Stop Smoking Is Good

As part of the American Lung Association’s “Quitting Smoking” campaign, Lung Protection has compiled a list of information regarding the dangers of smoking and the benefits of stopping smoking.

There are many reasons to quit smoking, but it’s important to remember that not all of them have to do with smoking.

The following are reasons to quit smoking that also apply to the use of other tobacco products.

You can find more information about quitting smoking online by going to the American Lung Association’s “Quitting Smoking” page.

1. The World Health Organization projects that by 2030 tobacco use will be the second leading cause of death worldwide, behind only tobacco use by people who are 65 years or older.
2. According to the CDC, tobacco is the single leading cause of preventable death in the United States. It is the leading cause of preventable death in young adults.
3. According to the CDC, approximately one in every 10 deaths in the United States are caused by tobacco products.

4. Lung Cancer

Approximately 90 percent of lung cancer deaths in the United States are due to smoking.

Each year, about 35,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with lung cancer, and more than 15,000 people die from lung cancer.

In the United States, more people die from lung cancer than from colon, breast, or prostate cancer combined.

Smoking is the single biggest risk factor for lung cancer. Quitting smoking will not only protect your health, it can also help you live longer.

5. Asthma and COPD

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are lung diseases that affect millions of people throughout the world.

Both asthma and COPD can cause inflammation in your lungs, which can lead to breathing problems.

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects your airways, which can cause the airways to narrow and become inflamed. This causes you to experience shortness of breath (dyspnea), wheezing, and chest tightness.

COPD is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes persistent airway obstruction. This can cause wheezing, frequent chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

Smoking is the leading cause of COPD and the third leading cause of lung cancer.

6. Stroke

A stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks blood flow to part of your brain or your heart. A blood clot in your brain can cause a stroke.

According to the CDC, smoking is the leading cause of stroke, accounting for up to 70 percent of all stroke cases.

Smoking is the leading cause of death by stroke, and more than 90 percent of all strokes occur in people who have smoked.

If you are a smoker, you should know that smoking increases your risk of stroke by at least 40 percent.

7. Heart Disease

Heart disease is a term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the heart. It is a leading cause of death in the United States.

According to the CDC, approximately one in four deaths in the United States are caused by heart disease.

Heart disease begins when plaque builds up in the arteries, putting strain on your blood vessels. This can cause blood clots, which can block blood flow and damage your heart muscle.

This damage can lead to heart failure, which is when the heart is not able to pump enough blood to the body.

Smoking is a major risk factor for heart disease. According to the CDC, smoking is the leading cause of death by heart disease.

8. Cancer

According to the CDC, smoking is the single leading cause of all cancer deaths.

Smoking is also associated with many other types of cancer, including:

  • Lung cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Oral cancer
  • Kidney cancer
  • Larynx cancer
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Pharynx cancer
  • Gastric cancer
  • Liver cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Colon cancer
  • Leukemia
  • Skin cancer

Smoking is a known cause of many types of cancer. Quitting smoking is the best way to avoid cancer.

9. Diabetes

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking is the leading preventable cause of blindness in the United States.

If you smoke, your risk of developing diabetes is much higher.

10. COPD

COPD is a disease caused by inflammation in the lungs and airways. It is a chronic condition that can be difficult to manage.

According to a study from the National Institutes of Health, smoking is the leading cause of COPD.

Smoking is the leading cause of death by COPD, and more than 90 percent of all COPD deaths occur in people who have smoked.

11. Heart Attacks

According to a study from the American Heart Association, smoking is the leading cause of death by heart attack.

The study found that smoking is responsible for more than one-third of all heart attacks in the United States.

In addition to smoking, other risk factors for heart attacks include:

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Insulin resistance
  • High stress

Research has found that smoking not only causes heart disease, but that it also increases the risk of other diseases, including:

  • Stroke
  • Heart failure
  • Aortic aneurysms
  • Pneumonia
  • All-cause mortality

Smoking cessation can not only help prevent many types of heart disease, but it can also improve the overall health of your heart.

How to Stop Smoking?

You can’t avoid smoking completely, but if you aren’t a smoker, you can make some changes to your lifestyle that can help you stop smoking.

The best way to quit smoking is to make lifestyle changes. This is because it is often difficult to quit smoking because of nicotine cravings.

Quitting smoking isn’t easy, but it can be done. Here are some tips to help you quit.

1. Stop smoking

If you are a smoker, talk with your doctor about the best way to stop smoking. Make sure they understand the reasons why you want to stop.

The best time to stop smoking is at the start of your quitting process. Your doctor can help you decide when you are ready to quit.

Your doctor can also help you to keep the benefits of quitting. This may include helping you to avoid withdrawal symptoms and mental health changes.

2. Avoid secondhand smoke

Secondhand smoke is caused by the smoke from other people’s cigarettes.

Secondhand smoke can irritate your airways and lungs. It can also cause illness.

If you are around people who smoke, try to avoid letting them smoke in your presence.

If you do smoke, try to stay away from anyone else’s smoke. Let them know that smoking is harmful to you.

3. Get regular physical activity

Physical activity can help you to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight.

It can also help to strengthen your heart, lungs, and other organs.

4. Maintain a healthy diet

A healthy diet can help you to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. Eating a well-balanced diet can help to prevent diseases, including heart disease.

A diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help you to keep your immune system strong.

5. Maintain a healthy weight

Being overweight is a risk factor for heart disease. To help you lose weight, make sure that you eat a well-balanced diet and get regular physical activity.

6. Stay away from alcohol

Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of heart disease. It can also make your heart work harder.

If you drink alcohol, try to drink in moderation.

7. Manage stress

Stress is a common problem for many people.

Stress can increase your blood pressure, blood sugar, and heart rate. This can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.

To help manage stress, you can try to:

  • Learn to manage your stress.
  • Try to relax.
  • Maintain a healthy sleep schedule.
  • Practice meditation.
  • Practice yoga.

8. Limit your intake of saturated fats

Saturated fats are found in animal products and can raise your cholesterol levels. This can increase your risk of heart disease.

To help limit saturated fats, try to:

  • Limit your intake of red meat.
  • Limit your intake of dairy.

9. Limit your intake of trans fats

Trans fats may help to lower your cholesterol levels.

Trans fats may be found in:

  • Processed foods
  • Fried foods
  • Margarine
  • Vegetable shortening
  • Baked goods
  • Processed vegetable oils

To help limit trans fats, try to:

  • Use oils that are hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated.
  • Buy unsaturated fats.

10. Quit smoking

If you want to quit smoking, it’s important to see your doctor for help.

Your doctor can help you to give up cigarettes. They can also help you to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

It may take a few weeks of gradually quitting smoking before you can stop completely.

If you’re having withdrawal symptoms, you may need to work with a doctor to help you stop taking certain medications.

If you’re having withdrawal symptoms and quitting smoking, it’s important to stop smoking. You have to give up the habit as soon as possible.

11. Ask your doctor

Ask your doctor for help. Ask about your options for quitting smoking.

Ask your doctor if you should:

  • Get a nicotine patch or gum.
  • Try other over-the-counter (OTC) medication.
  • Use a prescription medication.

Ask your doctor if you need to stop eating or drinking.

12. Make changes to your diet

In addition to quitting smoking, making changes to your diet can help you to lose weight and maintain a healthy weight.

If you are overweight, you may be able to lose weight by:

  • Cutting back on carbohydrates.
  • Eating a healthy amount of protein and healthy fats.
  • Eating a high-fiber diet.
  • Eating smaller, more frequent meals.

13. Be physically active

It may help you to be more physically active. Physical activity can help you to control your weight and maintain a healthy weight.

What’s the takeaway?

If you want to quit smoking, it’s important for you to see your doctor. They can help you to quit smoking.

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