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Quit Smoking With Tabex

Stop Smoking For Surgery

Smoking increases your risk of lung injury and other complications after surgery.

If you need surgery, ask your surgeon if smoking can be stopped before the procedure. Discuss the risks of surgery with your surgeon. You should also discuss the risks of surgery with your surgeon if you smoke. If you smoke, ask if you can stop.

If you smoke, your surgeon may need to stop you from smoking before your surgery. Some surgeons may also want you to stop smoking for the rest of your life. Ask your surgeon if it is okay for you to smoke.

If you smoke after surgery, ask your surgeon how much nicotine is in the medication your surgeon gives you.

Nicotine is a component in many medications that might be used during surgery, including general anesthesia. The amount of nicotine in each dose varies. It is possible that even small amounts of nicotine can cause side effects.

For a general anesthetic, the dose of nicotine in the medication is 10 to 40 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight. For a regional anesthetic, the dose of nicotine is 0.5 to 1 mg per kg.

Ask your surgeon if you can smoke after surgery.

What Is Vocal Cord Dysfunction?

Vocal cord dysfunction is when you have trouble singing, or when the sound that you make doesn’t sound like the sound you want it to.

Vocal cord dysfunction is usually caused by a problem with your vocal cords. Your vocal cords are part of your airway. They connect your throat and your lung. The vocal cords also help you make the sounds that you want to make.

There are many things that can cause vocal cord dysfunction. The most common causes of vocal cord dysfunction include:

  • A change in the pressure in your lungs
  • A change in the volume of your lungs
  • A change in the pressure inside of your lungs
  • An injury to your vocal cords
  • A tumor in your throat
  • A blockage in your windpipe
  • A tear in your vocal cords

Your doctor can often tell if you have vocal cord dysfunction based on your symptoms and your medical history.

How Is Vocal Cord Dysfunction Diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical exam to check for vocal cord dysfunction. They will also ask you about other symptoms that you have. Your doctor will look at the sound that you make with your mouth and with your tongue. They will also look at the way that you make your sounds.

Your doctor may also do a test called a laryngoscopy. During this test, your doctor will put a scope in your mouth and look at your vocal cords. The test can show if the vocal cords are swollen or blocked.

How Is Vocal Cord Dysfunction Treated?

Treatment will depend on the cause of your vocal cord dysfunction.

If your vocal cord dysfunction is caused by a blockage in your windpipe, your doctor may be able to treat the blockage with surgery.

If you have vocal cord dysfunction caused by a tumor, your doctor may be able to remove the tumor and treat it with radiation therapy.

If a tear in your vocal cords is causing your vocal cord dysfunction, your doctor may be able to repair the tear.

If your vocal cord dysfunction is caused by an injury, your doctor may be able to repair the injury.

What Else Should I Know?

Ask your doctor for more information about vocal cord dysfunction. This information will help you make an informed decision about your treatment options.

Take Your Meds

Ask your doctor what you should do if you smoke. This will help you stop smoking.

Ask your doctor if you should quit smoking. This will reduce your risk of complications.

Avoid Vaping

Ask your doctor if you should avoid vaping. Smoking e-cigarettes and vaping products can cause serious lung injuries.

Ask your surgeon or doctor if you can vape after surgery.

What Are the Risks Involved with Vocal Cord Dysfunction?

Vocal cord dysfunction is usually not serious. But it can be serious if you don’t get treatment.

If you smoke, your risk of lung injury and other complications is higher.

You may also have:

  • Trouble breathing or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Fever
  • Wheezing
  • Chills
  • Shaking
  • Chest tightness
  • Sudden dizzy spells

What Is the Long-Term Outlook?

If you smoke, you may be able to quit smoking. If you quit smoking, your risk of complications is lower.

Ask your surgeon or doctor what you can expect if you have vocal cord dysfunction. It’s important to understand your risk before you decide to treat it. There are many things that you can do to help you manage your risk of vocal cord dysfunction.

How Can I Prevent Vocal Cord Dysfunction?

You can’t prevent vocal cord dysfunction. But you can lower your risk of complications. This involves quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and managing other risk factors.

Ask your surgeon or doctor what you can do to help prevent vocal cord dysfunction.

What Are the Complications Associated with Vocal Cord Dysfunction?

Complications are more likely if you don’t take care of your vocal cords. They include:

  • A hoarse voice
  • A sore throat
  • A hoarse throat
  • A change of voice
  • Trouble singing
  • A strained voice
  • A hoarse or weak voice
  • A lack of breath control
  • A hoarse or weak cry
  • Bad breath
  • A change of smell
  • A cough
  • An increase in mucus production

The Bottom Line

Vocal cord dysfunction can happen to anyone. Ask your surgeon or doctor what you can do to manage your risk of vocal cord dysfunction.