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How To Stop Smoking When Pregnant?

The effects of smoking on the baby are more often than not, irreversible and can be quite dangerous. Smoking during pregnancy can cause the baby to be born with a cleft lip or palate, problems with fetal growth, stillbirth, low birth weight, low head circumference, and more.

Smoking during pregnancy is one of the most common causes of stillbirth. In fact, smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in children under five.

In the United States, women who smoke are more than twice as likely to have a stillbirth than women who do not smoke.

Smoking also increases the risk for miscarriage, premature labor, and low birth weight.

What if you’re pregnant and want to stop smoking?

If you’re trying to quit smoking and are pregnant, your best bet is to quit cold turkey.

You can’t just stop suddenly when you’re pregnant. You must give your baby enough time to develop, and you’ll still need to continue a healthy, balanced diet and get lots of sleep.

The best thing to do is to gradually reduce the amount of cigarettes you smoke. This can be done by cutting back by a half and by cutting out certain types of cigarettes.

Here are some tips to help you quit:

  • Quit all smoking within two weeks.
  • Try to not smoke for at least 24 hours before you quit.
  • Try to avoid using other people’s cigarettes.
  • Do not smoke in people’s homes or in a car.
  • Do not smoke around children.
  • Stop if your symptoms return or if you have a fever.

How can I quit smoking during pregnancy?

  • Be consistent-Quit smoking for at least 24 hours and then follow the tips above.
  • Quit cold turkey.
  • Do not smoke in people’s homes, in a car, or in a restaurant.
  • Quit if you have a fever, cough, or sneeze.
  • Seek support from family, friends, and professionals.

What are the benefits of stopping smoking?

  • Improves your overall health.
  • Reduces your risk of developing a heart attack, stroke, and other illnesses.
  • Improves your fertility.

What are the risks of stopping smoking?

  • Increases your risk of miscarriage.
  • Increases your risk of having a stillborn baby.
  • Increases the risk of having a baby with a cleft lip or palate, problems with fetal growth, stillbirth, low birth weight, and low head circumference.
  • Increases the risk of premature labor and delivery.
  • Decreases the amount of oxygen that your baby receives.
  • Decreases your chances of getting pregnant.

Can I stop smoking after I’ve had a?

Just like before you had a baby, you need to give yourself time to recover and to prepare the body for the new baby.

It’s also a good idea to quit cold turkey if you want to stop smoking.

Other than the risks mentioned above, there are no other risks associated with quitting cold turkey. If you have any concerns, talk with your doctor or other health care professional.

What if I want to stop smoking later in my pregnancy?

If you want to quit smoking later in pregnancy, there are still some important steps you should take.

The American Pregnancy Association recommends that all women who smoke give up by the end of the third trimester or first trimester.

While there are many benefits of quitting smoking, it is very important that you don’t smoke in the hours just before delivery.

If you have any concerns about stopping, talk with your doctor or other health care professionals.

How can I reduce my risk of a stillborn baby?

  • Lose weight-If you’re trying to give up smoking and if you’re overweight or obese, you are more likely to have a stillborn baby.
  • Talk to your doctor about your weight and if you should lose weight.
  • If you smoke, try to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • If your doctor prescribes you medications or recommends other treatments, ask your doctor if smoking is one of them.
  • If possible, avoid using other people’s cigarettes.
  • If you’re pregnant, try to avoid being around secondhand smoke.
  • If your baby has a cleft lip or palate, you’ll need to talk with your doctor about the risks.

What if I’m pregnant and I want to stop smoking?

It’s best to quit cold turkey if you’re pregnant.

The American Pregnancy Association recommends giving up by the end of the first trimester.

What if I want to quit smoking later in pregnancy?

It’s best to quit cold turkey if you’re trying to quit smoking later in your pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant, you’ll need to give up within two weeks of the baby’s birth.

What if I want to quit smoking and I don’t have a baby?

If you don’t want to quit smoking or your baby doesn’t have a birth in mind, you can give it some time.

Remember that you still need to keep a healthy diet and get plenty of sleep.

You should also avoid being around other people who smoke.

When should I see my doctor?

You need to see your doctor if you’re pregnant and want to quit smoking.

If you’re pregnant, you may want to see your doctor if you’re having any of the following symptoms:

  • A fever
  • A cough
  • A sore throat
  • Congestion
  • A runny nose
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Tiredness
  • Aches and pains
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Chest pains
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Chills
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Backaches
  • Frequent urination
  • Skin rash or hives
  • Bleeding or spotting
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Excessive tiredness

At your appointment, your doctor will ask questions about your habits and health, including whether you’ve had any health problems.

They may also ask about your smoking habits, and they may ask you to stop smoking in the hospital or at home.

They may also recommend that you see a dietitian or a smoking cessation counselor.

The American Pregnancy Association recommends that you quit smoking by the end of the first trimester.

What is the outlook?

There is no cure for smoking, so there is no way to “stop it cold turkey.”

But there are many things you can do to reduce your risk of a stillborn or death baby.

Even if you’re not able to quit completely, the following tips can help.

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